Following up 8 years after two ‘first-in-man’ knee osteoarthritis treatments

In October 2017, Professor James Richardson delivered a momentous announcement at the 11th annual Oswestry Cartilage Symposium. After more than 20 years of trials and research, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) finally approved chondrocyte cell therapy for the treatment of articular cartilage defects. This historic decision is anticipated to have a profound impact on the cartilage repair field in the UK and globally.

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Communication between organelles gives cells a breath of fresh air

The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) forms an interconnected network of tubules and has several crucial roles in cells. These include the folding and maturation of proteins, the formation of lipids (fats), the orchestrating of biological activities and the trafficking of small solutes and other compounds necessary for cellular processes. To perform its functions, the ER must communicate with all other organelles; the tiny cellular structures that perform specific functions within a cell.

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Social scientists working with LinkedIn data

Today, researchers are using LinkedIn data in a variety of ways: to find and recruit participants for research and experiments (Using Facebook and LinkedIn to Recruit Nurses for an Online Survey), to analyze how the features of this network affect people’s behavior and identity or how data is used for hiring and recruiting purposes, or most often to enrich other data sources with publicly available information from selected LinkedIn profiles (Examining the Career Trajectories of Nonprofit Executive Leaders, The Tech Industry Meets Presidential Politics: Explaining the Democratic Party’s Technological Advantage in Electoral Campaigning).

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“We Cannot Let Them Die”: Undocumented Immigrants and Media Framing of Health Deservingness in the United States

The findings drawn from this study call attention to a recent paradigm shift in the U.S. progressive media—from the notion of the undocumented as a criminal and deviant to humanizing perspectives that spotlight their contributions and struggles, as well as the economic benefits of providing them with health insurance.

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Instead of seeing criticisms of AI as a threat to innovation, can we see them as a strength?

At CogX, the Festival of AI and Emergent Technology, two icons appeared over and over across the King’s Cross location. The first was the logo for the festival itself, an icon of a brain with lobes made up of wires. The second was for the 2030 UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), a partner of the festival.

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Feminist Political Economy in a Globalized World: African Women Migrants in South Africa and the US

Migration is one of the most important social phenomena of our times. In the social science literature, particularly among US-based scholars, African migrant women remain an understudied population. The experiences of African women migrants, either as immigrants or refugees, clearly demonstrate that migration is a gendered process.

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Sex-typed chores and the city: What does urbanicity have to do with chores?

How does place structure the gendered division of household labor? Because people’s living spaces and lifestyles differ dramatically across urban, suburban, and rural areas, it follows that time spent on household chores may vary across places. In cities, for example, many households do not have vehicles or lawns, and housing units tend to be relatively small. Urban men’s and women’s time use therefore provides insight into how partners contribute to household chores when there is less structural demand for the types of tasks they typically do

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Why do voters choose corrupt politicians?

While in public citizens express their clear rejection of corruption and their intentions not to support corrupt politicians, empirical evidence shows that voters around the world only mildly punish corrupt politicians. From a theoretical point of view it is puzzling how corrupt governments survive in democratic societies, as one of the main functions of free elections, a fundamental to every democracy, is to hold governments accountable.

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The political revolt of the lower middle class against automation: a common explanation for Brexit, Trumpism or the yellow vests

Labour markets in advanced economies are increasingly marked by job polarisation, whereby job creation occurs either at the high- or low-skill levels, while mid-skill jobs are disappearing. This is mainly due to the process of automation of many routine-based tasks, as machines, computers, and robots can replace certain repetitive human tasks. What impact does this development have on politics? In our recent paper, we demonstrate that the fear of labour automation may translate into greater support for radical right parties.

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Helping and Hindering Undergraduate Women’s STEM Motivation: Experiences with STEM Encouragement, STEM-Related Gender Bias, and Sexual Harassment

Sexual harassment and gender bias in STEM undermine women’s STEM motivation, leading to fewer women in STEM fields. Addressing sexism in STEM in educational and work contexts is needed to promote women’s potential and gender equality in society.

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What’s the harm in mixing alcohol and drugs? A lot, apparently!

In a recent study that Dr. Meenakshi Subbaraman and I published with colleagues in the journal Nordic Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, we found that U.S. adults who use alcohol and drugs at the same time are more likely to report signs of alcohol use disorder and drug abuse than users who do not mix substances.

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