Posts in Research
Does Educational Digital Storytelling Intervention help increase adolescents’ HIV risk perception?

Dr. Theresa Ofoegbu and I have found that Educational Digital Storytelling Intervention (EDSI) is effective in increasing human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) risk perception and knowledge among adolescents in Nigeria. This unexpected finding indicated that educational technologists, counsellors, psychologists, and medical professionals should consider the development and implementation of EDSI to increase HIV risk perception and knowledge in different sectors of society.

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Communication between organelles gives cells a breath of fresh air

The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) forms an interconnected network of tubules and has several crucial roles in cells. These include the folding and maturation of proteins, the formation of lipids (fats), the orchestrating of biological activities and the trafficking of small solutes and other compounds necessary for cellular processes. To perform its functions, the ER must communicate with all other organelles; the tiny cellular structures that perform specific functions within a cell.

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What’s the harm in mixing alcohol and drugs? A lot, apparently!

In a recent study that Dr. Meenakshi Subbaraman and I published with colleagues in the journal Nordic Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, we found that U.S. adults who use alcohol and drugs at the same time are more likely to report signs of alcohol use disorder and drug abuse than users who do not mix substances.

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Why are there ethnic differences in cardio-metabolic risk factors and cardiovascular diseases?

The population of Europe has become increasingly more ethnically diverse with an estimated 55% of residents in urban London originating from non-White British backgrounds. Studies investigating populations of various ethnic backgrounds have found the risk of developing heart disease, diabetes, or having a stroke as significantly different for people even living in the same area.

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Using beef cattle to learn more about obesity and pulmonary hypertension in humans

The increased occurrence of both adult and juvenile overweight and obese individuals, termed the “obesity epidemic” in the US and other developed nations, has been accompanied by attendant increases in cardiovascular disease.

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Isolating therapeutic procedures to investigate mechanisms of change in cognitive behavioral therapy for depression

Although cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is the most extensively studied and evidence-based treatment for depression, 47% of the individuals suffering from depression show no response to CBT, and improvement is highly necessary.

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Self-monitoring for health and wellness

The use of persuasive technologies (PT) aimed at encouraging desirable change by shaping and reinforcing behavior, attitude, or both, is growing in virtually all areas of health and wellness. Self-monitoring, through various tools including smartphone apps and other devices, is the cornerstone of many of these technologies – enabling the user to track and evaluate their behavior and set personal targets.

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Why are African Americans more susceptible to acute respiratory distress syndrome?

Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a vexing critical care illness in patients with respiratory failure. A fundamental pathobiological feature of ARDS is an increase in blood vessel permeability, and the permeability of its lining, resulting in excessive fluid leakage and the infiltration of inflammatory cells into the functional parts of the lung or parenchyma.

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