Playing with gender borders: Flirting and alcohol consumption among young adults in Denmark

Building on 140 interviews with young adults in Denmark between the ages of 18 to 25 and of different genders we explored how young adults narrate their personal experiences with flirting in such nightlife spaces, and how they navigate within gender norms when doing so.

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Why are there ethnic differences in cardio-metabolic risk factors and cardiovascular diseases?

The population of Europe has become increasingly more ethnically diverse with an estimated 55% of residents in urban London originating from non-White British backgrounds. Studies investigating populations of various ethnic backgrounds have found the risk of developing heart disease, diabetes, or having a stroke as significantly different for people even living in the same area.

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Navigating big data dilemmas

Facebook is yet again dominating news headlines, this time for its #10YearChallenge encouraging users to post pictures of themselves from 10 years ago and today. While ostensibly a fun and trivial exercise, the viral challenge raised questions regarding whether the game was initiated by Facebook to gather data on its users. This led Zak Doffman to claim in Forbes, “The world of Big Data has clearly changed in the last year”.

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Using beef cattle to learn more about obesity and pulmonary hypertension in humans

The increased occurrence of both adult and juvenile overweight and obese individuals, termed the “obesity epidemic” in the US and other developed nations, has been accompanied by attendant increases in cardiovascular disease.

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Isolating therapeutic procedures to investigate mechanisms of change in cognitive behavioral therapy for depression

Although cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is the most extensively studied and evidence-based treatment for depression, 47% of the individuals suffering from depression show no response to CBT, and improvement is highly necessary.

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Self-monitoring for health and wellness

The use of persuasive technologies (PT) aimed at encouraging desirable change by shaping and reinforcing behavior, attitude, or both, is growing in virtually all areas of health and wellness. Self-monitoring, through various tools including smartphone apps and other devices, is the cornerstone of many of these technologies – enabling the user to track and evaluate their behavior and set personal targets.

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Why are African Americans more susceptible to acute respiratory distress syndrome?

Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a vexing critical care illness in patients with respiratory failure. A fundamental pathobiological feature of ARDS is an increase in blood vessel permeability, and the permeability of its lining, resulting in excessive fluid leakage and the infiltration of inflammatory cells into the functional parts of the lung or parenchyma.

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Keep calm, there is an app to help you control your smartphone use

Are you spending too much time on your smartphone? Do you ever feel like you’re missing out if you have not checked your phone in a while? If that is the case, you are not the only one. But do you know what to do about it? Ironically, there are apps that could help you.

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Five Tips to Promote Your Paper to the Public Using Social Media

Congratulations, you’ve published your paper! As focus on science communication (scicomm) continues to rise in the academic community, social media is a natural fit for promoting work to the media, public, or policy makers. It also provides a space for open, two-way dialogue. This post will give you a great jump-start in learning to utilize social media to engage the public in your research.

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